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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 79 (some duplicates have been removed)
petraeus, has been holding security talks in pakistan as divisions deepen between washington and islamabad. the u.s. is holding hundreds of millions of dollars in security assistance. pakistan has called for an end to u.s. drone raids that have been taking an increasing civilian toll. >> u.s. drones' fly it around the clock in pakistan, targeting fighters in the mountainous region bordering afghanistan. civilians are often killed in the attacks. pakistan has condemned the ground strikes as a violation of its sovereignty, although some analysts believe they are carried out with the help of pakistan the -- pakistani intelligence. >> we are firmly against all terrorist groups. but we fight in partnership with other law-enforcement agencies. >> washington announced it was holding back a third of the military aid earmarked for pakistan, $100 million. airstrikes are putting more pressure on the already tense relationship between the u.s. and pakistan. >> give the pakistan government the drones. that is the way it should be. [unintelligible] >> the dispute shows no sign of easing. islamabad is th
pakistan describes the move against an american citizen arrested in the u.s. this week and accused of working for pakistan. this is the latest in a rapidly deteriorating relationship which was highlighted when the u.s. killed osama bin laden and pakistan. the prime minister is currently in london. my colleague asked if he understood why the u.s. had not told pakistan. >> that is the thing we did not like. >> you understand why? >> they did not want to share their victory with pakistan, they only want to share defeat. >> what they're indicating is that they did not trust the military and your security services to not leak it. >> when we had intelligence sharing with them and the people, the most wanted terrorist of al qaeda, we helped them. there was no reason not to share with us. >> did the isi note that osama bin laden was less than a mile away from your defense academy? >> he had been there for a long time. i want to ask you one question, whether the world intelligence failed? the whole failure of the world. >> did you know that bin laden was there? did your intelligence service
and pakistan. with the help of pakistan. so i think that sometimes we just go from one end of greek allies, great friends which is what was your longtime, in the previous administration, two gosh, these guys are no good, et cetera. this is not the way to do business between two allies and partners. and i think we will not interpret the remarks as a letter. we understand them to be a reflection of american statement of policy, and the americans have the right to defend their homeland by ensuring that terrorists are plotting against the american homeland are dealt with. but as far as the other concern, we are very confident of our sovereignty. we would like to protect our sovereignty. and sovereignty requires that when operations take place in pakistan they should take place without knowledge and our participation. >> a quick follow. does that mean if there's a second rate, that your forces would fire on the rich? >> when i became ambassador to the united states, i went and saw very good colleague of mine, another professor of international, and i said i've been ambassador before but that wa
on g.m.t., we bring you pakistan's new jazz-playing orchestra. also a one-time presidential challenger. questioning him on bribery allegations. the heatwave across the central and eastern parts of the united states is being blamed for causing more than 20 deaths. the temperatures rising to 43 degrees centigrade. further deaths are forecasted with predictions temperatures will not fall until sunday at the earliest. >> a sweltering heat we have a is spreading across the united states, and millions are struggling to stay cool. punishing conditions have spread from southern areas to the east coast. >> tonight on world news, the hidden dangers. >> the heat is making american headlines. the national weather service has issued warnings to areas affecting for man half the population. despite thi soaring temperatures have the tragic consequences. >> in my secure they, two women died in their 70's and 30 peep have died. in big cities, cooling centers have been set up to provide emergency relief. >> i sat outside a few minutes ago, and already i'm extremely uncomfortable. a huge open-air sauna, a
and pakistan. we must always be on our guard, but now, i am informed that this figure has been significantly reduced. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakens. in afghanistan, british and other forces have driven al qaeda from their bases, and while it is too early to tell for certain, initial evidence shows we have halted the certai suggests we halted the momentum of the talibannsurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighti and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no pper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afgha
you, pat. the u.s. embassy under attack in syria. how is the united states responding? in pakistan they are burning our flags. and we are giving them millions. [ male announcer ] there's more barbeque time in every bag of kingsford charcoal. kingsford. slow down and grill. . >> our flag on fire, the u.s. embassy under attack as was the american ambassador's residence, people described as "thugs," reaching the wall of the embassy compound and breaking cameras and bonds and the united states is seeking compensation for the damage. meanwhile the united states announcing cutting back aid to pakistan. $800 million in military aid is being withheld after they decided to cancel vistas for 100 military trainers and my guest says the cuts are a good start. lieutenant colonel peters joins me. welcome. this is 40 percent of our annual aid to pakistan. should we retract the rest of it, as well? >>guest: i wish we could cut all aid to pakistan. pakistan is a rogue state. the pakistani military and security services are addicted to terror and we keep giving them money for another fix. but we can
india's financial capital, and the strings go straight back to afghanistan and pakistan. that's coming up. [ male announcer ] at nissan, we test the altima's durability on a track that simulates the world's toughest roads. ♪ [ tires screeching ] ♪ if it can survive this drive... ♪ it can survive yours. the nissan altima. innovation that lasts. innovation for all. ♪ there's another way to minimize litter box odor: purina tidy cats. tidy cats premium line of litters now works harder to help neutralize odors in multiple-cat homes. and our improved formula also helps eliminate dust. so it's easier than ever to keep your house smelling just the way you want it. purina tidy cats. keep your home smelling like home. >>> well, flash point in india, tensions rising syria as well, 21 dead, 100 blood yesterday after a coordinated attack in mumbai. a mass set of confusion this hour to who's to blame. police looking into the indian mujahedeen. also a suspicion on militant grew ups that led a sewage in '08. today three blasts hit during the rush hour, just days after the seven-year anniversar
efforts with pakistan. currently the u.k. is the second-largest of the foreign military force in afghanistan. from london, this is just under an hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with permission i would like to make a statement on afghanistan. formerly i said this government has sought to take a more hard hit security based approach to the mission.vernment as i've said, we are not there to build a perfect democracy, still a model society.re yes, we will help with the detablishment of demographicild institutions and yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage democrac development, but we are in afghanistan. we can improve infrastructure, develop education and encourage development the we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to shore our own national security by helping the afghans take control of theirs. that means building up security forces to drive down british combat forces where the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is poignant today on a plot executed by a
to reintegrate in those areas. secondly, more broadly, put more pressure on pakistan, the biggest outside government supporter of the taliban. if they were to suddenly decide they wanted to cut a deal, that would put pressure on the taliban. unfortunately, we are not seeing across-the-board big three in all locations, nor we seeing pakistan put pressure on them -- a cross-led dashboard victory -- across-the-board- victory in all locations, nor are we seeing pakistan put pressure on them. we're seeing the taliban lose ground in the south. i suspect part of that is contesting areas that the taliban does -- >> thank you for coming in. the worst drought in decades is forcing thousands of families in east africa to walk for days to find refugee camps. the un says some very young children are dying before they ever get there. rain fell for the past three seasons. people are facing dire shortages of food, shelter, and health services. we are in a kenyan refugee camp, the largest of its kind in this world, for this story. >> day after day, mile after mile, they walked and walked. these are the pe
operations in pakistan? >> let me say a couple things about that. number one, from the outset of the administration we determined that we would launch an aggressive, focused, relentless effort on al qaeda and associated groups to dismantle, disrupt and ultimately defeat them. we've been doing that successfully. and we're going to continue these efforts and these efforts are focus the on al qaeda central and south asia but also focused on affiliates around the world, number one. number two, we have the capability to continue this. without commenting on the story that you have outlined here, i have every confidence we can continue this, that we will continue this effort at a pace in an intensity that will allow to us put al qaeda -- continue to put al qaeda on the road to defeat with respect to the pakistanis. the pakistanis, fareed, and the united states have a complicated relationship, as you know. there will be frustrations and disagreements. we remained engaged with the pakistanis for a number of very important reasons related to our national security and ultimately their se
in northwestern pakistan. 6000 people were attending a rally organized by a senior member of the pakistan muslim league. he hopes a way can be found to quickly deliver aid to drought- stricken somalia. he was speaking at the end of the u.s. refugee camp in e.d. appeared he said that the death rates seen during the crisis have been staggering and american help was being set back. the somalia border in southeastern ethiopia. >> an uncertain start to new life as refugees. hundreds of somalis moving into this refugee camp, one of the three existing camps for somalis here. and problematic ever since it opened. hot, dust-filled wind blows through the camp for much of the time. for now, all too few of the refugees have the protection to these protections of a tent. a stubbornly high death rate here. the delegation representing the u.s. and other supporters came to see what needs to be done to prevent this refugee emergency turning into a disaster. >> the main thing is to focus on the humanitarian side in very deep need of better tend facilities, better health facilities as well. yes, but this is a top
military operations in pakistan? >> a couple of things about that. number one, from the outset of the administration we determined we would launch an aggressive, focused, relentless effort on al qaeda and associated group to disrupt and dismantle them and we have been doing that successfully. the ranks have been decimated as the president said in his speech in afghanistan. and we will continue these efforts. these efforts are focused on al qaeda central in south asia and affiliates around the world. number two. we have the capability to continue to do this. and without commenting on the story you have outlined here, i have every confidence we can and will continue this effort at a pace and intensity that will allow us to put al qaeda on the road to defeat with respect -- with respect to the pakistanis, there is a complicated relationship and there are frustrations and disagreements. we remain engaged with the pakistanis for a number of important reasons related to our national security and i think their ultimate security. they are an important counterterrorism partner for the u
to pakistan. tensions were already high before the al qaeda leader osama bin laden was killed in a u.s. raid in an army raid. more recently, 100 military trainers have been expelled, and they threatened to shut down a c.i.a. base. our correspondent, aleem maqbool, is in islamabad, and earlier, i asked him how humiliating this is for pakistan given they need u.s. aid to help pay for security. >> we keep hearing leaks about various things that the american officials are accusing pakistan of doing. certainly the pakistanis feel very much under pressure. they do need the dollars, but not to the extent that we might think, because they do get a large proportion -- the pakistani army gets a large proportion of the domestic budget here, but it is the humiliation more than anything that will help the pakistani army. and yes, the two sides do need each other. nobody's talking about breaking up completely, but it's whether this will have the desired effect that washington wants or not, and that is something we simply can't tell right now. >> aleem maqbool. in syria, supporters of the government and so
from the middle east and afghanistan and pakistan. americans were the new gold standard and we have a generation al-qaida 2.0 and they are the new version of the digital jihadist. >> historically said terrorist are a muslim male and if you don't fit that profile you don't have to worry. in the book you say that is no longer the model. >> that's right. the american sudden al awaki. whether he is e-mailing or bloging or skyping he using technology and the facebook friend from hell. he spreads ideology to. there is a documented case was home grown terrorism since january 2009 every few weeks. >> what is a sign that a parent ought to be worried about their child recruited or sought after by the terrorist? >> common links we see is the american cleric. lookk at the cases in the united states. almost always the fingerprints of this digital jihadist . the young man who drove the car bomb not far from where we are. he was a diseeple . travel to pakistan and got his training. this event in times square was a successful attack. he drove a car in there with what he thought was a viable explosi
to stand up and do the tough things. >> let me turn to pakistan, quickly, there's an article in the "new york times" today, saying that the money is being reduced to pakistan, hundreds of billions of dollars. the president came in, saying that he would agree to bring pakistan to the table with more aid. has that policy failed and is therera change of policy now? >> it's not changed -- it's not failed, pardon me. the truth of the matter is, our relationship with pakistan has been complicated. obviously, they're an important ally on the fight of terrorism. a victim of enormous amounts of terrorism. right now they've taken steps to given us reason to pause on the aid which we're giving to the military and we're trying to work through that. it's a complicated relationship and a very difficult complicated part of the board. obviously there's still a lot of pain that the political system in pakistan is feeling by virtue of the raid that we did to get osama bin laden. something that the president felt strongly about. we have no regrets over. but the pakistani relationship is difficult, but it m
aid to pakistan. they're with holding it, expelling military trainers and they hope holidaying back all that money will make pakistan crack down harder on militants and terrorists. what's the best way to describe the relationship with pakistan right now? >> they've been an important ally in the fight on terrorism, they've been the victim of enormous amounts of terrorism, but right now they have taken steps that have given us reason to pause on aid which we have give on the their military and we're trying to work through that. it's a complicated relationship in a difficult part of the world. >>> and here's a figure for you. $37 billion. according to them, that much money could vanish this year from pockets. two out of ten dollars americans took in came in the form of money from government and when those extended benefits go away by the end of the year, some $37 billion onto go into people's accounts and hence won't go into the economy. let e let's go to kristie lu stout for your morning hit from hong kong. christy good morning. >> good morning, ali. >> it begins after hours markets c
pakistan a strong message >> the pakistani relationship is difficult but it must be made to work overtime. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the many that the american taxpayers have committed to give. >> some $800 million? >> yep. >> it's a lot of cash but is it a political move. our next guest called out the pakistani government in 2006 claiming they knew osama bin laden in's location. peter thompson joins me. he's the author of the new book "the wars of afghanistan." good to see you. >> thank you. >> i want to get your thoughts we reported that the half-brother of huh mean karzai in afghanistan has been assassinated. how does that affect the relationships? >> he was assassinated by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
to pakistan. >> thanks so much for joining us. kcsm needs you financial support. you can pledge at any dollar level that is comfortable for you. at the 50 dollar level, you will receive the kcsm polo shirt. whenever you wear it, you'll show your support of kcsm, the bay area's independent public tv station. this 100 percent cotton shirt features the kcsm logo on the front. it's a great way to show your appreciation for your local independent public tv station. also to say thank you we'll include a dvd copy of one of the many kcsm produced documentaries.
to pakistan. >> thanks so much for joining us.
the militants based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been described as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever is behind it shows that the largest city is still vulnerable. >> we have been to the site of one of the explosions and this is the report. >> this is one of three locations where explosions have taken place in mumbai. just behind this police cordon, a bus stop where a vehicle packed with explosives was located and detonated. this along with two other blasts in the city took place in peak time in russia. in highly densely populated areas. lots of traffic are around. we are hearing as many injuries. they have been taken to local hospitals. the leaders have been coming to this area and said that the priority is to make sure that the injured were taken care of and treated. this is unclear as to who is behind these attacks exactly what has taken place and whether there is any correlation to those attacks that took place in 2008 and five years ago. >> that the venezuelan president hugo chavez has acknowledge that he will need more treatments for cancer.
beau we were focused on the middle east and pakistan. and became the new gold standard and we have now a generation, i call it al-qaeda 2.0. in many respects they're the new version of the digital jihadists. so when you're talking about the fact that we've historically said, well, a terrorist is probably going to be a muslim, may open the muslim east, if you don't fit the profile chances are you don't have to worry. because in the book you say that's no longer the model. >> that's right. the heart of this is actually an american citizen anwar al-awlaki, he's a digital jihad its, whether he's e-mailing or blogging or skyping, he's kind of like the facebook friend from hell. he's using the negotiate networking against us and spreading the ideology of hate. what's frightening there's a documented case of home grown terrorism every two to three weeks since january of 2009. something we didn't see a decade ago. >>. >> mike: what are the signs a parent ought to be worry about, if their child is being recruited or sought after. >> one of the things we are see is the american cleric. if you lo
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
after the entire terrorist infrastructure inside of pakistan. >>dave: are we taking our eye off the ball? all we hear about is al qaeda? panetta and general petraeus saying we close to finishing them off. is that a public perception? >>guest: i'm concerned by the fact they do recite that there is a war on al qaeda and there are other groups like the indian mujaheddin who is in the to be a front for l.e.t. which operates openly in pakistan. a vast array of groups with the same ideology of al qaeda and we have to go after them just as much. >>dave: what role did pakistani play in this and are they our friend or foe? >>guest: the l.e.t. operate a huge infrastructure in magazine stage and bragged they have 200 facilities operating in pakistan and they have charity schools and pakistan does nothing about it. >>dave: and the funding of the military, we have cut off the military funding. is pakistan saying you need to start the money flowing again here? or we will in the help you? >>guest: that is the direction they are moving. i expect a rise in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that mess
the truth is that al-qaida's hierarchy in afghanistan and pakistan that he's referring to has been severely weakened. we've seen several al-qaida leaders killed over the past ewu months and years. to say al-qaida's hierarchy has been weakened and could possibly be defeated is true. but al-qaida has shifted to yemen, to somalia and also the al-qaida movement. it's become such a global galvanizing movement, brian. you have self-starters here in america, in england who are acting on their own with no direct link to al-qaida so you can defeat al-qaida, yes, but the movement that al-qaida has sparked, the ideology is the real problem here and brian, real quick, this administration when they talk about the war on terror, the war against radical islam, they have tunnel vision! al-qaida is only one element of a much broader enemy, iran, hezbollah and the muslim brotherhood which this administration wants to reach out to. >> which is a little crazy. tell us about this bomb throw, we'll talk about this a little bit later as well. tell about the next move is sewing these explosive devices into people'
.s. raid into pakistan that led to the killing of osama bin laden. you also would do away with, in essence, the c.i.a. why did you oppose the raid and what would you put in the place of it? >> well, the question to me was i was just saying it could be done differently. i mean, all this does was raise questions and i predicted that this would lead to a lot of resentment and think of the chaos in pakistan and the mess that we have. we both bomb them and give them money and people hate their own government because their own government's a puppet of ours. my frustration with bin laden was it took so long. >> woodruff: and the c.i.a., you would.... >> couric: i don't think the c.i.a. should be a military arm of the government dropping bombs secretly. you can't even separate the two. you don't even know who is controlling the bombing of this country now. >> woodruff: a couple questions about your campaign. you have a son who was elected to the united states senate rand paul from the state of kentucky. this is your third try for president. there was some talk he was looking at running for preside
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
stronghold to the border of pakistan. he will turn over the forces on july 18. >> congress returns from its holiday break as the clock continues to tick towards the august 2 default deadline. kate amara has more. >> with time running out, there is now talk of a temporary measure. congress comes back to work today. the senate cancelling this week's planned recess. on august 2, the government will run out of money to pay its bills. chances are a deal was not done this week. >> there is a lot of discussion that has to take place before signing on the dotted line. a lot of the senate will be in session. this is for a show as much for anything. >> democrats are pushing for spending reductions along with billions of dollars in new revenue. republicans insist the plan cannot include tax increases. >> this is a situation unlike any i've seen it in my years following the federal budget. the most important reason is that compromise is not acceptable. >> there are suggestions now that both sides may be willing to embrace a mini-deal of six to eight months which would include the cuts negotiators have
. >>> the white house has confirmed that it got will back $8 billion. they also say it's retaliation for pakistan's expulsion of u.s. military advisers. we're going to be getting an update on debt ceiling negotiations in the u.s. when president barack obama holds a news conference in just a few hours. he plans to meet with the republican and democratic leaders again on monday to try to come up with a deficit reduction deal. those are the headlines. this is cnn in london. "world business today" starts right now. >>> hello, welcome to "world business today." i'm charles hodson in london. >> and i'm paula chu in hong kong. >> "news of the world" is climbing the corporate ladder with reports that rebeba brooks is set to speak to police. >>> companies and consumers cry foul as australia's prime minister imposes a tax on the country's worst polluters. >>> they're trying to keep greece on tack. their grossing fears of the debt contagion is affecting italy. >> before all of that, let's take you to the stock markets and the aftershocks from friday's dismal stock report. only 18,000 jobs had been added in
compound that u.s. and pakistan were not on the same page. >> we will following this. reza, thanks. >>> petree watched as a gra maid landed near him. he grabbed grabbed the grenade and threw it back. it severed his right hand. this afternoon he is awarded the medal of honor for his life-saving action. barbara starr is joining us live from the pentagon. barbara, tell us more about this pretty usa young man. >> reporter: he will receive the medal of honor later today from president obama in the white house what they call acting above and beyond the call of duty. it was a very daring daylight raid that they were on. usually, these types of compound raids take place under the cover of darkness. they went in during the day after insurgents. when they got in the compound, heavy fire end. the only place to find cover was a chicken coop and where they tried to fire back from. petree, a grenade tossed to his area in the chicken coop. he picked it up, already wounded and threw it back at the insurgents. it went off in his hand and he lost his right hand. but according to other troops who wer
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 79 (some duplicates have been removed)